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How to Introduce Yourself after Military Service, Part 1

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Have you ever made a horrible introduction? Really, just so bad you don’t want to run into that person again? Maybe you fumbled over trying to translate your military jargon into civilian terms or gave an explanation of what you do or want to do that was much too long and detailed.

Whatever the case, we’ve all been there. Many of us have been taught to use the “elevator pitch” to introduce ourselves in corporate settings. But is that truly the best method?

Elevator pitches tend to get boring and compact too much complex information into too short of a time span. They’re also based on a construct that you’ll need to explain your whole business and sell it to someone within 30 seconds, which is rarely a realistic scenario. But one thing the elevator pitch does get right is that you’ve got to practice.

As an entrepreneur, or in any job, networking is key to success. You have to be able to make consistent, long-lasting connections frequently – with potential partners, potential investors, potential clients, you name it. Making these connections is like taking a test you already know the questions to in advance. It’s a lot easier to study when you know exactly what will be on the exam.

Here’s the question: So, what do you do?

Now that you know exactly what’s coming, it makes sense to prepare. We just don’t recommend doing it in the form of an elevator pitch. Instead, next week we will be sharing Clay Hebert’s simple formula for veterans introducing themselves to others. To get ready to learn this hands-on formula, take some time to reflect this week:

Who does your business serve? What result do you help your clients achieve?

bethany@americandreamu.org

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